European Day of languages - 26 september.

European Day of languages - 26 september.

mir ali du berdas casin. maura dai ‘sali’ du ajas femin ki vai nu casino. femino bai en mauran on ofia li gataon. maura nei on dai ku li debi soi menontas. femino sen tritas mu lu gai lei, maura ali. maura dai ‘isali’. ko pri du cezin, maura rui ku li soi lias telin a casino-feminaso. li pri jil osidas toui feminon fri spagetin.

germannn:

My Favorite German Words, My Barber and I

by Ed M Wood (x)

facets-and-rainbows:

Kanji: 水 and the water radical 氵
水 is the kanji for water, based on a drawing of flowing water. It’s pronounced すい (sui) in compounds borrowed from Chinese and みず (mizu) in native Japanese words, and it’s found in words about water:
水(みず) water, especially cool/cold water (hot/boiling water has its own word, 湯, pronounced ゆ/yu)
水泳(すいえい) swimming (泳 swim)
汚水(おすい) sewage (汚 dirty)
塩水(しおみず) salt water (塩 salt)
水色(みずいろ) light blue (“water-colored”: 色 color)
水 is also a radical in a few other kanji about water. You’ll usually see it on the bottom of the kanji.
…But you can also crush it down to three dots/drops 氵and write it on the left side of a kanji. This is the most common “water” radical, and one of the most common radicals period. Kanji with the water radical usually have something to do with water (or liquids in general).

facets-and-rainbows:

Kanji: 水 and the water radical

水 is the kanji for water, based on a drawing of flowing water. It’s pronounced すい (sui) in compounds borrowed from Chinese and みず (mizu) in native Japanese words, and it’s found in words about water:

  • 水(みず) water, especially cool/cold water (hot/boiling water has its own word, 湯, pronounced ゆ/yu)
  • 水泳(すいえい) swimming (泳 swim)
  • 汚水(おすい) sewage (汚 dirty)
  • 塩水(しおみず) salt water (塩 salt)
  • 水色(みずいろ) light blue (“water-colored”: 色 color)

水 is also a radical in a few other kanji about water. You’ll usually see it on the bottom of the kanji.

…But you can also crush it down to three dots/drops 氵and write it on the left side of a kanji. This is the most common “water” radical, and one of the most common radicals period. Kanji with the water radical usually have something to do with water (or liquids in general).

image

someone: this language is really hard
me: i'm gonna learn it
ballpitfucker:

it’s called AAVE, you FUCKTRUCK
I hate how people here think that “proper general English” is the only way to speak English and all the others are considered “idiocy” like if language has anything to do with intelligence. I’m not even from the U.S. and I know this better than most of you.
Below is a list of all English dialects in North America:
American English - Standard American English is the general form
Cultural
African-American Vernacular English (AAVE)
Chicano English
New York Latino English
Pennsylvania Dutch English
Yeshivish
Yinglish

Regional
New England English
Boston accent
Boston Brahmin accent
Hudson Valley English
Lake Dialect or Lake Talk
Vermont English

Inland Northern American English (includes western and central upstate New York)
Northeast Pennsylvania English

Mid-Atlantic dialects
Baltimore dialect
Philadelphia dialect
Pittsburgh English
New York dialect
New Jersey English dialects

Inland Northern American English (Lower peninsula of Michigan, northern Ohio and Indiana, Chicago, part of eastern Wisconsin and upstate New York)
North–Central American English (primarily Minnesota, but also most of Wisconsin, the Upper peninsula of Michigan, and parts of North Dakota, South Dakota, and Iowa)
Yooper dialect (Upper Peninsula of Michigan and some neighboring areas)

Midland American English
North Midlands English (thin swath from Nebraska to Ohio)
St. Louis
South Midland (thin swath from Oklahoma to Pennsylvania)

Southern English
Appalachian English
Tidewater accent
Virginia Piedmont
Virginia TidewaterCoastal Southeastern (Charleston, South Carolina, Savannah, Georgia area)
Cajun English
Harkers Island English (North Carolina)

Ozark English
Southern Highland English
Gullah or Geechee
Texan
Yat dialect (New Orleans)
Ocracoke

Western English
California English
Boontling
Pacific Northwest English

Hawaiian Pidgin
Canada
Canadian English:
Newfoundland English
Maritime English
Cape Breton accent
Lunenburg English

West–Central Canadian English
Northern Ontario English
Quebec English
Ottawa Valley Twang
Pacific Northwest English

Bermuda
Bermudian English
Native/American indigenous peoples
Native American/indigenous peoples of the Americas English dialects:
Mojave English
Isletan English
Tsimshian English
Lumbee English
Tohono O’odham English
Inupiaq English

ballpitfucker:

it’s called AAVE, you FUCKTRUCK

I hate how people here think that “proper general English” is the only way to speak English and all the others are considered “idiocy” like if language has anything to do with intelligence. I’m not even from the U.S. and I know this better than most of you.

Below is a list of all English dialects in North America:

American English - Standard American English is the general form

Canada

Canadian English:

Bermuda

Bermudian English

Native/American indigenous peoples

Native American/indigenous peoples of the Americas English dialects:

Anonymous wrote:
So if we wanted to watch some French animation, what films would you suggest?

young-angry-and-fabulous:

disneyforprincesses:

pumpkinspiceaddiction:

the Triplets of Belleville is about an elderly woman searching for her son who was kidnapped in the middle of a Tour de France race. It’s largely free of dialogue, but the sound effects and such are wonderful. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature—it lost to Finding Nemo.

A Cat in Paris is about a young girl and her cat who discover mysteries in the course of one night. It was also nominated for an Oscar for Best Animated Feature, but it lost to Rango.

Persepolis is based on an autobiographical graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi about her early life in Iran. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, but it lost to Ratatouille.

the Illusionist is about an aging magician and an imaginative young girl who form a father/daughter relationship. It was also nominated for a Best Animation Oscar, but lost to Toy Story 3.

The Rabbi’s Cat is a story about a cat who swallows a parrot and gains the ability to speak like a human. It is set in 1920’s Algeria.

Ernest & Celestine is the adorable story about a big bear and a little mouse who forge an unlikely friendship. It was also nominated for an Oscar in Best Animated Picture, but lost to Frozen.

Kirikou and the Sorceress is a story inspired by West African folklore that tells the story of Kirikou, a boy who was born with the ability to walk and talk, who saves his people from an evil witch. The film was popular enough to spawn sequels and a stage adaptation.

A Monster in Paris is a 3D animated musical film that is reaaaaalllly loosely based on the Phantom of the Opera. It’s set in 1910 and is about, surprisingly, a monster that lives in Paris, and his love for a young singer.

The King and the Mockingbird is an 80’s film about a cruel king titled Charles V + III = VIII + VIII = XVI, who is obsessed with a young shepherdess, and whose attempts to capture the young girl are thwarted by a mockingbird whose wife the King had previously killed.  

Those are probably the most famous of the feature length animated films.

But the animated short films are just as glorious. Here’s a compilation of a bunch of short films and I can link you to others as well. 

Sorry for the long answer but I just really love French animation.

Reblogging over here. French animation tends to do better with diversity than Disney does, hahaha.

I should add “Le Tableau” which is really beautiful, especially if you love art. This movie is highly poetic !

image

"A château, flowering gardens, a threatening forest, here is what, for mysterious reasons, a Painter has left incomplete. Three kinds of characters live in this painting: the Toupins, who are entirely painted, the Pafinis, who lack a few colors, and the Reufs, who are only sketches. Considering themselves superior, the Toupins take over power, chase the Pafinis from the château, and enslave the Reufs. Convinced that only the Painter can restore harmony by finishing the painting, Ramo, Lola, and Plume decided to go looking for him. Throughout the adventure, questions will follow one after the other: What has become of the Painter? Why did he abandon them? Why did he begin destroying some of his paintings? Will they one day know the Painter’s secret?"

I would highly recommend Ernest & Celestine as the animation is beautiful, the characters are really moving and the story conveys a great message about love, friendship and oppression.

Another thing : have you seen how these amazing movies lost to american big productions ?

FR- ç

jaimetalangue:

Alright, I’ve seen several missuses of the letter ç in French around this website, so I’m going make it clear for everyone. The letter c has 2 different pronunciations:

  • /k/ when followed by aou, or a consonant - e.g. cascade, crotte
  • /s/ when followed by eiy. - e.g. merciicicecicygne

When you need the /s/ sound but the c is followed by aou, that’s when you add the cedilla: façadeçacommençafaçon

When you need the /k/ sound but the c is followed by ei, the rule is generally to change it into ququequicommuniquer

I hope this is useful and helps you guys make it clearer :)

jaimetalangue:

FR- L’Anatomie - Anatomy

> Anatomy vocab in |Ελληνικά| |Español| |Русский| |Français| |Italiano| |Deutsch|

> Other vocab posts |in this post| or |on this page|

Favourite Websites (So Far) For Mandarin:

allthelanguages:

I’ve been self-studying Mandarin Chinese for the past few weeks in preparation fo uni and my inability/unwillingness to buy resources has led to me finding these sites :)

:D